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Emba Electricity building $1.7bn coal plant in Turkey

Shanghai Electric Power backing Emba Electricity coal fired thermal power plant to link China’s ‘Belt & Road’ initiative with Turkey's ‘Middle Corridor’ vision.

Emba Electricity Production has begun construction of the Hunutlu Thermal Plant in the Turkish coastal town of Yumurtalik, in the southern province of Adana.

Emba Electricity Production - owned by Shanghai Electric Power (78%), the Avic International Project Engineering Company, and two undisclosed Turkish investors - is developing the $1.7bn flagship project to link China’s ‘Belt & Road’ initiative with Turkey's ‘Middle Corridor’ vision.

The imported coal fired thermal power plant projects in Turkey will have a capacity of 2 x 660 MW. The power plant will be 8,000 hours operational in a year and it will produce 11,5 billion kWh electricity power.It is expected to contribute an estimated 3% of all electricity supplies across Turkey.

There will be an employment opportunity for 4,000 employees at the construction phase and 500 employees at the production phase.

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Wang Yundan, CEO of the Shanghai Electric Power Company, said that he aims to build a clean and reliable power plant with high efficiency, which is also expected to help boost Turkey's economy, raise employment and promote sustainable power generation. 

Emba Electricity has stated: “By means of SEP’s experience in power generation for a century and up to date technologies, we will try our best to build an environment friendly, clean coal fired power plant with high capacity, high reliability and high efficiency. For which, a number of measures are to be adopted to control the air pollutants, water pollutants, solid waste and noise.”

The project is planned to begin its first phase of operation at the end of 2021.

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