Practical Tips to Winterize Your Home This Fall from Window

|Sep 30|magazine11 min read

FULTON, Md., Sept. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- With the thermometer slowly starting to drop, now is the ideal time to prep your home for winter and tackle any projects lingering on that to-do list. Especially as more people use their homes as their office and classroom these days, homeowners are truly starting to notice more things in their home that need to be addressed thanks to all the extra time spent there. Winterizing your home and tackling small projects – from DIY to calling in the professionals – can result in not only saving hundreds of dollars in energy bills, but can serve as a creative outlet and nice distraction.

In fact, according to the Los Angeles Times, the home improvement industry continues to experience an increase in demand, as more Americans across the country are investing in home upgrades than in previous years. MarketWatch adds that since COVID-19 emerged, younger homeowners – particularly millennials – are among the highest spenders within this category. Bank of America recently polled over 1,050 Americans, revealing more than 70 percent of participants surveyed have performed home improvement projects this year and plan to complete additional renovations come 2021.   

"We've always been in the business of making people feel happy, comfortable and safe in their homes, which has become even more important amid this time of massive uncertainly and with colder weather quickly approaching – and we don't take this responsibility lightly," says Harley Magden, CEO of Window Nation, one of the country's largest window replacement companies with 25 years of combined experience servicing customers. "Replacing windows can have a huge impact on families' daily routines right now, such as brightening a spare bedroom turned office space with more natural light or providing better noise reduction for children while distance learning."

In terms of winterizing a home, an easy place to start is looking at window conditions. Cracked and warped windows can often cause heat to escape.

"Windows that produce a draft or feel cold on the inside should be replaced," explains Richard Kasunic, a home repair expert with Window Nation who had 45 years of experience in the industry. "Modern vinyl windows fit tightly to shield homes from wind, water infiltration and other inclement weather. With that said, many homeowners have older windows and are unknowingly wasting costly heat."

On average, people spend 40 percent of their utility expense dollars on heating and cooling. However, if new windows aren't in this year's budget, homeowners can opt for insulated curtains, window and door gap seals, as well as place draft snakes on windowsills. Adding storm windows to existing panes is another cost-effective way to increase energy efficiency.

Kasunic also suggests replacing the weather-stripping around doors if light appears around the edges. For less than $20, homeowners can noticeably reduce electrical bills throughout the year.

Beyond windows, exterior outlets, plumbing/utility access, chimneys and walkways should be sealed for unwanted holes. Individuals are also encouraged to have their furnaces professionally cleaned and inspected, as well as roofs and gutters, because they're more of a hassle to fix when temperatures are frigid. It's also a good idea to cover air conditioning units outside (a quick search on Amazon can yield inexpensive covers for under $40). Mobile apps, like Energy Cost Calculator, Smappee Energy Monitor and MyEarth, can also help users understand energy habits to reduce their overall costs and carbon footprints.

Finally, experts advise covering water heaters and changing the furnace filters, so your appliances don't have to work as hard. And, if you are thinking of new windows, Kasunic agrees that fall is the best time of year for both installation and price.

"We understand – not everyone needs, wants or has the means to focus on home renovations right now," explains Magden. "They have much bigger issues. But, for those that do and seek professional help, we have a no-contact solution to make the process as safe, seamless and convenient as possible, so our customers don't have to worry about another challenge."

In an effort to ensure the safety of all customers, employees and their families amid coronavirus, Window Nation is now offering homeowners the option to receive a virtual consultation and estimate via video conferencing. They can upload photos to receive precise measurements, and installations are completed with minimal disruption. Depending on a customer's individual preferences, needs and circumstances, Window Nation experts are still available to provide in-home consultations and education, while strictly adhering to CDC safety and sanitation guidelines.

Contact: 
Victoria Manenti
for Window Nation
330.402.0000
[email protected] 
www.windownation.com

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SOURCE Window Nation