Skip to main content

Tallest buildings in Mexico

Mexico has seen a steep rise in the construction of tall buildings within the last decade as a result of significant investment which has been placed within Latin America. Large corporations have expanded their operations to the metropolis, alongside the development of current and existing infrastructures and cultural establishments to accommodate for an ever-increasing number of tourists who visit the country.

10 | Torre Reforma Latino: Mexico City

Gaining LEED Platinum upon completion in 2014 is the Torre Reforma Latino, a mixed-use tower containing 47 floors, providing office and retail space within a column free design.

The build provides stunning views of the city, at the centre of the financial district, alongside embedded energy efficiency systems, obtaining LEED Silver certification. 

9 | World Trade Center: Mexico City

Originally opening in 1970s, the World Trade Center (WTC) underwent extensive renovation in the 1990s to incorporate a number of technologies and services. With close rail links, the build now houses an office and convention centre spanning 50 storeys, reaching heights of 587ft.

The WTC is also home to cultural and entertainment areas, such as a cinema and theatre, restaurant a retail center.  Similar to other skyscrapers in the region, the tower also incorporates intelligent systems to detect seismic activity, but also control lighting and equipment to ensure human safety.

8 | Torre Altus: Mexico City

Built with reinforced concrete, glass and aluminium, the Torre Altus in Mexico City was also one of the first initial green buildings in the area, with sophisticated technologies throughout its structure. Designed by architect Augusto Alvarez, the tower has survived several strong earthquakes through a number of reinforcements, spanning 640ft.

The building contains 45 floors, of which seven are below ground level, housing over 40 apartments. A Building Management System has been incorporated to ensure the safety of residents, in addition to several sports and leisure facilities which are accessible for residents.

7 | Pabellón M: Monterrey

Situated in Monterrey lies the Pabellón M, a mixed-use skyscraper incorporates a multitude of facilities, from a hotel containing over 170 rooms, leisure facilities and auditorium, which can accommodate over 4,000 citizens.

Designed by architect Agustín Landa, the skyscraper reaches heights of 214 metres and also contains over 10 restaurants, a number of retail facilities, convention center, but also incorporates 30,000m2 of office space, embedded within 27 floors.

Similar to other skyscrapers, the eradication of internal columns has created a sense of space. The auditorium incorporates a mechanical lifting system and an array of sophisticated technologies to become one of the most iconic cultural venues. Built by engineer Salomon Marcuschamer alongside architect Landa, the auditorium is utilised for plays, concerts and cultural events.

6 | Torre Ejecutiva Pemex: Mexico City

One of the older skyscrapers built within Mexico, the Torre Ejecutiva Pemex, has withstood earthquakes due to its ingenious design, encompassing shock absorbers to minimise displacement, with an embedded x-braced structure, reaching heights of 214 metres.

Named after the state-owned Petroleum company, the building was designed by architect Pedro Moctezuma Diaz Infante alongside developer Robledo Construcciones e Instalaciones S.A de C.V, the build now is home to over 7,000 employees, situated over 53 floors, and has become an iconic landmark within Mexico City.

5 | Hotel Riu Plaza Guadalajara: Guadalajara

Situated in Guadalajara, the Hotel Riu Plaza Guadalajara has become one of the largest hotel resorts in the region at 705ft. Built at a total cost of $110 million, the concrete, steel and glass build opened in 2011, and contains over 40 floors, with over 550 rooms, communal and restaurant areas spread over 88,000sq ft.

4 | Torre Mayor: Mexico City

Designed by Adam Associates Architects, Zeidler Partnership Architects and IDEA Asociados de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos, the Torre Mayor took approximately four years to build, completing in 2003 and achieved LEED certification, reaching heights of 225 metres.

Constructed by Reichmann International, the reinforced concrete and steel build has embedded several features to counteract seismic activity, with the implementation of seismic dampers, ensuring the build can survive earthquakes measuring up to 8.5 in the Richter scale.

An embedded Building Management System has also been implemented, allowing elevators to detect any movement and cease at the nearest floor in an emergency, increasing passenger safety.

Constructed with luxury materials, such as marble and granite for communal areas, the modern design also houses over 20,000m2 of glass, creating a sophisticated design and world-class technologies.

3 | Torre BBVA Bancomer: Mexico City

Situated in Mexico City, the Torre BBVA Bancomer skyscraper has been designed and constructed by LegoRogers, a partnership between LegoRogers + Legorreta and Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners at a total cost of $655 billion. Achieving gold LEED energy standard, the build is now home to BBVA Bancomer, Mexico’s largest bank, housing approximately 4,500 staff.

Reaching heights of 235 metres and encompassing 50 storeys, the skyscraper has a triple height lobby, with separate access for senior level executives. Sky gardens provide sufficient relaxation areas, which can be accessed through glass elevators, leading to a sky lobby which provide full views of Chapultepec Park and the city.

2 | Torre Reforma: Mexico City

Reaching heights of over 800ft, the Torre Reforma skyscraper has become one of the tallest buildings in Mexico, encompassing over 50 floors accommodating both retail and office space over 60,000m2.

Designed by Mexican architect Benjamin Romano at LBR & A Architects, the reinforced concrete build is not supported by columns, creating an internal open space, but has also been built to withstand seismic activity.

The $100 million construction has gained LEED Platinum due to its focus on sustainability, with over 80 percent of local materials also utilised within the construction.

Incorporating entertainment, retail outlets, restaurants and fitness facilities, the skyscraper also contains a carpark for over a thousand vehicles.

1 | Torre KOI: San Pedro Garza Garcia

Currently under construction, the Torre KOI will become the tallest building in the region once completed, spanning a total height of 918ft. Reaching 69 storeys, the construction has been designed by V&FO Arquitectos and Stark+Ortiz, with engineering work from Thornton Tomasetti and contractor Internacional de Inversiones. Upon completion in 2017, the mixed-use tower will incorporate a hotel, office space and luxury apartments.

Like many tall buildings in the region, the building will aim to achieve LEED Silver certification.

1 of 10

10 | Torre Reforma Latino: Mexico City

Gaining LEED Platinum upon completion in 2014 is the Torre Reforma Latino, a mixed-use tower containing 47 floors, providing office and retail space within a column free design.

The build provides stunning views of the city, at the centre of the financial district, alongside embedded energy efficiency systems, obtaining LEED Silver certification. 

9 | World Trade Center: Mexico City

Originally opening in 1970s, the World Trade Center (WTC) underwent extensive renovation in the 1990s to incorporate a number of technologies and services. With close rail links, the build now houses an office and convention centre spanning 50 storeys, reaching heights of 587ft.

The WTC is also home to cultural and entertainment areas, such as a cinema and theatre, restaurant a retail center.  Similar to other skyscrapers in the region, the tower also incorporates intelligent systems to detect seismic activity, but also control lighting and equipment to ensure human safety.

8 | Torre Altus: Mexico City

Built with reinforced concrete, glass and aluminium, the Torre Altus in Mexico City was also one of the first initial green buildings in the area, with sophisticated technologies throughout its structure. Designed by architect Augusto Alvarez, the tower has survived several strong earthquakes through a number of reinforcements, spanning 640ft.

The building contains 45 floors, of which seven are below ground level, housing over 40 apartments. A Building Management System has been incorporated to ensure the safety of residents, in addition to several sports and leisure facilities which are accessible for residents.

7 | Pabellón M: Monterrey

Situated in Monterrey lies the Pabellón M, a mixed-use skyscraper incorporates a multitude of facilities, from a hotel containing over 170 rooms, leisure facilities and auditorium, which can accommodate over 4,000 citizens.

Designed by architect Agustín Landa, the skyscraper reaches heights of 214 metres and also contains over 10 restaurants, a number of retail facilities, convention center, but also incorporates 30,000m2 of office space, embedded within 27 floors.

Similar to other skyscrapers, the eradication of internal columns has created a sense of space. The auditorium incorporates a mechanical lifting system and an array of sophisticated technologies to become one of the most iconic cultural venues. Built by engineer Salomon Marcuschamer alongside architect Landa, the auditorium is utilised for plays, concerts and cultural events.

6 | Torre Ejecutiva Pemex: Mexico City

One of the older skyscrapers built within Mexico, the Torre Ejecutiva Pemex, has withstood earthquakes due to its ingenious design, encompassing shock absorbers to minimise displacement, with an embedded x-braced structure, reaching heights of 214 metres.

Named after the state-owned Petroleum company, the building was designed by architect Pedro Moctezuma Diaz Infante alongside developer Robledo Construcciones e Instalaciones S.A de C.V, the build now is home to over 7,000 employees, situated over 53 floors, and has become an iconic landmark within Mexico City.

5 | Hotel Riu Plaza Guadalajara: Guadalajara

Situated in Guadalajara, the Hotel Riu Plaza Guadalajara has become one of the largest hotel resorts in the region at 705ft. Built at a total cost of $110 million, the concrete, steel and glass build opened in 2011, and contains over 40 floors, with over 550 rooms, communal and restaurant areas spread over 88,000sq ft.

4 | Torre Mayor: Mexico City

Designed by Adam Associates Architects, Zeidler Partnership Architects and IDEA Asociados de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos, the Torre Mayor took approximately four years to build, completing in 2003 and achieved LEED certification, reaching heights of 225 metres.

Constructed by Reichmann International, the reinforced concrete and steel build has embedded several features to counteract seismic activity, with the implementation of seismic dampers, ensuring the build can survive earthquakes measuring up to 8.5 in the Richter scale.

An embedded Building Management System has also been implemented, allowing elevators to detect any movement and cease at the nearest floor in an emergency, increasing passenger safety.

Constructed with luxury materials, such as marble and granite for communal areas, the modern design also houses over 20,000m2 of glass, creating a sophisticated design and world-class technologies.

3 | Torre BBVA Bancomer: Mexico City

Situated in Mexico City, the Torre BBVA Bancomer skyscraper has been designed and constructed by LegoRogers, a partnership between LegoRogers + Legorreta and Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners at a total cost of $655 billion. Achieving gold LEED energy standard, the build is now home to BBVA Bancomer, Mexico’s largest bank, housing approximately 4,500 staff.

Reaching heights of 235 metres and encompassing 50 storeys, the skyscraper has a triple height lobby, with separate access for senior level executives. Sky gardens provide sufficient relaxation areas, which can be accessed through glass elevators, leading to a sky lobby which provide full views of Chapultepec Park and the city.

2 | Torre Reforma: Mexico City

Reaching heights of over 800ft, the Torre Reforma skyscraper has become one of the tallest buildings in Mexico, encompassing over 50 floors accommodating both retail and office space over 60,000m2.

Designed by Mexican architect Benjamin Romano at LBR & A Architects, the reinforced concrete build is not supported by columns, creating an internal open space, but has also been built to withstand seismic activity.

The $100 million construction has gained LEED Platinum due to its focus on sustainability, with over 80 percent of local materials also utilised within the construction.

Incorporating entertainment, retail outlets, restaurants and fitness facilities, the skyscraper also contains a carpark for over a thousand vehicles.

1 | Torre KOI: San Pedro Garza Garcia

Currently under construction, the Torre KOI will become the tallest building in the region once completed, spanning a total height of 918ft. Reaching 69 storeys, the construction has been designed by V&FO Arquitectos and Stark+Ortiz, with engineering work from Thornton Tomasetti and contractor Internacional de Inversiones. Upon completion in 2017, the mixed-use tower will incorporate a hotel, office space and luxury apartments.

Like many tall buildings in the region, the building will aim to achieve LEED Silver certification.

1 of 10

Facebook Conversations

NEWSLETTER

Construction Global Weekly