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Top 10 construction companies in Europe

One of the key measures to understanding a construction company’s growth is to examine its revenue streams. These are the Top 10 European construction companies based on revenue.

10 | NCC AB (Sweden)

NCC

Founded in 1988, NCC ranks as the second largest construction company in the Nordic area, posting $6.34bn in 2016 revenue. CEO Håkan Broman took the reins as acting CEO in October, 2017, after the outfit saw a modest backslide in revenue from 2015. The diversified company handles projects that include residential and commercial properties, civil engineering, roadways and public facilities, among others. Based in Stockholm, Sweden, the outfit employs upwards of 17,000 people and has taken on projects in Germany and the Baltic region. Its most noteworthy works include the 54-story Turning Torso building in Malmo, Oresund Link, Vasa Museum and Kista Science Tower.

 

9 | Koninklijke Bam Groep (Netherlands)

KBG

Headquartered in Bunnik, Netherlands, this diverse construction organization delves into environmental engineering, residential and non-residential construction, utilities and facility management among others. Koninklijke BAM Groep’s 2016 revenue was $8.14bn and it is structured into four segments. These include mechanical and electrical services for residential and commercial construction, a civil engineering wing, a property development sector, as well as a PPP segment that focuses on roads, rail, education, health care, and general construction. It includes a wide range of subsidiaries such as BAM Bouw en Vastgoed, BAM Construct UK, BAM Deutschland, BAM Belgium, BAM Contractors, BAM Infra, BAM Nuttall, Wayss & Freytag Ingenieurbau and BAM International. Its major accomplishments include the Amsterdam Arena football stadium, Antwerp Law Courts, Euroborg football stadium and the HSL-Zuid high-speed rail.

 

8 | Ferrovial (Spain)

Ferrovial

Headquartered in Madrid, this Spanish-based construction outfit saw a sizeable bump in revenue from 2015 to 2016. That upwardly trending revenue rose from $11.31bn to $12.55bn under the direction of CEO Iñigo Meirás Amusco. Employing upwards of 75,000 people, the company serves Spain, Portugal, Ireland, Switzerland, Greece, Canada, Chile, U.K. and the United States. Although the company’s name literally means “railroad,” its diversified operations include infrastructure projects, airport management, as well as residential and commercial building. Subsidiaries include Amey plc, and percentages of AGS Airports, and Heathrow Airport Holdings. Its most notable work is the Guggenheim Museum.

 

7 | Balfour Beatty (UK)

Balfour Beatty

Based in London, Balfour Beatty enjoyed a 2016 revenue stream of $12.36bn. The more than 100-year-old outfit works primarily in infrastructure, providing constructions services as well as support and investments. Its infrastructure work includes refurbishing existing structures, rail renewal and public roads. The company also enjoys a 50% stake in the Hong Kong-based Gammon Construction company. Balfour is overseen by CEO Leo Quinn and the 2016 revenue performed lower than the 2015 numbers. Its notable works date back to the Churchill Barriers in Orkney completed during the 1940s and the London Aquatics Centre in 2011. Key projects such as the Crossrail Liverpool Street Station, Aberdeen Western Peripheral Route are expected to reach completion during 2018. The outfit employs more than 30,000 people.

 

6 | Strabag

The Austria-based construction outfit employs more than 71,000 people and pulled in revenue upwards of $14.46bn in 2016. That was a dip from the 2015 revenue of $15.28bn behind CEO Thomas Birtel. Specializing in projects such as tunnels, civil engineering, and a variety of transportation infrastructure, Strabag has three main branch operations. One segment manages operations in Germany, Scandinavia, Poland and the Benelux countries with regards to offshore wind and hydraulic engineering. Another sector targets railway construction in countries such as Switzerland, Slovakia, Hungary, Austria and Russia among others. The international wing focuses on tunnelling, properties, infrastructure and materials. Strabag’s notable works include the Alte Wesser lighthouse, Copenhagen Metro, and Limerick tunnel in Ireland.

5 | Eiffage

Eiffage

This French engineering company is based in Asnières-sur-Seine and reported revenue of $16.69bn in 2016. Under the leadership of CEO Pierre Berger, Eiffage improved its revenue from $16.45bn in 2015. Eiffage has been a fast-riser in the construction world. Founded only 25 years ago, it has already emerged as a top five revenue-getter and completed projects such as the Channel Tunnel, Copenhagen Metro, Millau Viaduct and LGV Perpignan-Figueres high-speed rail. With a workforce topping 60,000 employees, the organisation has sectors in Belgium, Germany, Spain and Italy.

4 | Skanska (Sweden)

Skanska

Although Skanska saw its revenue slip from $19.13bn to $17.91bn in 2016, the Sweden-based outfits continues to be a top five European earner. Founded in 1887, Skanska is considered one of the oldest construction outfits in all of Europe. It focuses on construction, development, and infrastructure works and has holding in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland among others. Under the leadership of President and CEO Johan Karlström, Skanska has been touted as leading Green Builder in the U.K. and United States. The company earned the 2014 Financial Times’ “Boldness in Business Award.” Its notable works include St. Mary Axe, Mater Dei hospital in Malta, and London’s tallest building, Heron Tower.

 

3 | Bouygues (France)

Founded by Francis Bouygues in 1952, this Paris-based construction outfit has nearly 120,000 employees and pulled in revenue of more than $37bn in 2016. Now led by Chairman and CEO Martin Bouygues, its global interests include things such as civil engineering, real estate development, public works, and media telecommunications among others. It enjoys a presence in 80 countries and notable works include Paris’ Parc des Princes in Paris, Tour First, Musée d’Orsay, and Grande Arche among many others.

 

2 | ACS (Spain)

With more than 210,000 employees and 2016 revenue exceeding $37.30bn, ACS stands as one of Europe’s most prominent construction companies. Under the leadership of CEO Florentino Pérez, ACS has grown divisions that include residential and non-residential construction, infrastructure, services, industrial companies and minority investments. In 2011, it upped its stake in Hochtief to more than 50%, effectively taking ownership. It’s major notable successes include the Alqueva Dam, Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia, Torre Agbar, LGV Perpignan–Figueres High Speed railway and the Portugués Dam in Ponce, Puerto Rico, among others.

1 | Vinci (France)

Vinci

Headquartered in Rueil-Malmaison, France, Vinci enjoyed a steady revenue stream. In both 2015 and 2016, it exceeded $44bn to be Europe’s best. The construction outfit was founded in 1899 under the name Société Générale d’Entreprises S.A. and changed to Vinci in 2000. It enjoys deep roots in Europe and worldwide interests that include airports in Japan, Brazil, Portugal and has won public works projects in the United States. CEO Xavier Huillard oversees an operation of more than 180,000 employees. The company’s notable works include the Gariep Dam, Yamoussoukro Basilica, Pont de Normandie, Stade de France, and the Atlantic Bridge, Panama, which is expected to be completed in 2018.

 

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10 | NCC AB (Sweden)

NCC

Founded in 1988, NCC ranks as the second largest construction company in the Nordic area, posting $6.34bn in 2016 revenue. CEO Håkan Broman took the reins as acting CEO in October, 2017, after the outfit saw a modest backslide in revenue from 2015. The diversified company handles projects that include residential and commercial properties, civil engineering, roadways and public facilities, among others. Based in Stockholm, Sweden, the outfit employs upwards of 17,000 people and has taken on projects in Germany and the Baltic region. Its most noteworthy works include the 54-story Turning Torso building in Malmo, Oresund Link, Vasa Museum and Kista Science Tower.

 

9 | Koninklijke Bam Groep (Netherlands)

KBG

Headquartered in Bunnik, Netherlands, this diverse construction organization delves into environmental engineering, residential and non-residential construction, utilities and facility management among others. Koninklijke BAM Groep’s 2016 revenue was $8.14bn and it is structured into four segments. These include mechanical and electrical services for residential and commercial construction, a civil engineering wing, a property development sector, as well as a PPP segment that focuses on roads, rail, education, health care, and general construction. It includes a wide range of subsidiaries such as BAM Bouw en Vastgoed, BAM Construct UK, BAM Deutschland, BAM Belgium, BAM Contractors, BAM Infra, BAM Nuttall, Wayss & Freytag Ingenieurbau and BAM International. Its major accomplishments include the Amsterdam Arena football stadium, Antwerp Law Courts, Euroborg football stadium and the HSL-Zuid high-speed rail.

 

8 | Ferrovial (Spain)

Ferrovial

Headquartered in Madrid, this Spanish-based construction outfit saw a sizeable bump in revenue from 2015 to 2016. That upwardly trending revenue rose from $11.31bn to $12.55bn under the direction of CEO Iñigo Meirás Amusco. Employing upwards of 75,000 people, the company serves Spain, Portugal, Ireland, Switzerland, Greece, Canada, Chile, U.K. and the United States. Although the company’s name literally means “railroad,” its diversified operations include infrastructure projects, airport management, as well as residential and commercial building. Subsidiaries include Amey plc, and percentages of AGS Airports, and Heathrow Airport Holdings. Its most notable work is the Guggenheim Museum.

 

7 | Balfour Beatty (UK)

Balfour Beatty

Based in London, Balfour Beatty enjoyed a 2016 revenue stream of $12.36bn. The more than 100-year-old outfit works primarily in infrastructure, providing constructions services as well as support and investments. Its infrastructure work includes refurbishing existing structures, rail renewal and public roads. The company also enjoys a 50% stake in the Hong Kong-based Gammon Construction company. Balfour is overseen by CEO Leo Quinn and the 2016 revenue performed lower than the 2015 numbers. Its notable works date back to the Churchill Barriers in Orkney completed during the 1940s and the London Aquatics Centre in 2011. Key projects such as the Crossrail Liverpool Street Station, Aberdeen Western Peripheral Route are expected to reach completion during 2018. The outfit employs more than 30,000 people.

 

6 | Strabag

The Austria-based construction outfit employs more than 71,000 people and pulled in revenue upwards of $14.46bn in 2016. That was a dip from the 2015 revenue of $15.28bn behind CEO Thomas Birtel. Specializing in projects such as tunnels, civil engineering, and a variety of transportation infrastructure, Strabag has three main branch operations. One segment manages operations in Germany, Scandinavia, Poland and the Benelux countries with regards to offshore wind and hydraulic engineering. Another sector targets railway construction in countries such as Switzerland, Slovakia, Hungary, Austria and Russia among others. The international wing focuses on tunnelling, properties, infrastructure and materials. Strabag’s notable works include the Alte Wesser lighthouse, Copenhagen Metro, and Limerick tunnel in Ireland.

5 | Eiffage

Eiffage

This French engineering company is based in Asnières-sur-Seine and reported revenue of $16.69bn in 2016. Under the leadership of CEO Pierre Berger, Eiffage improved its revenue from $16.45bn in 2015. Eiffage has been a fast-riser in the construction world. Founded only 25 years ago, it has already emerged as a top five revenue-getter and completed projects such as the Channel Tunnel, Copenhagen Metro, Millau Viaduct and LGV Perpignan-Figueres high-speed rail. With a workforce topping 60,000 employees, the organisation has sectors in Belgium, Germany, Spain and Italy.

4 | Skanska (Sweden)

Skanska

Although Skanska saw its revenue slip from $19.13bn to $17.91bn in 2016, the Sweden-based outfits continues to be a top five European earner. Founded in 1887, Skanska is considered one of the oldest construction outfits in all of Europe. It focuses on construction, development, and infrastructure works and has holding in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland among others. Under the leadership of President and CEO Johan Karlström, Skanska has been touted as leading Green Builder in the U.K. and United States. The company earned the 2014 Financial Times’ “Boldness in Business Award.” Its notable works include St. Mary Axe, Mater Dei hospital in Malta, and London’s tallest building, Heron Tower.

 

3 | Bouygues (France)

Founded by Francis Bouygues in 1952, this Paris-based construction outfit has nearly 120,000 employees and pulled in revenue of more than $37bn in 2016. Now led by Chairman and CEO Martin Bouygues, its global interests include things such as civil engineering, real estate development, public works, and media telecommunications among others. It enjoys a presence in 80 countries and notable works include Paris’ Parc des Princes in Paris, Tour First, Musée d’Orsay, and Grande Arche among many others.

 

2 | ACS (Spain)

With more than 210,000 employees and 2016 revenue exceeding $37.30bn, ACS stands as one of Europe’s most prominent construction companies. Under the leadership of CEO Florentino Pérez, ACS has grown divisions that include residential and non-residential construction, infrastructure, services, industrial companies and minority investments. In 2011, it upped its stake in Hochtief to more than 50%, effectively taking ownership. It’s major notable successes include the Alqueva Dam, Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia, Torre Agbar, LGV Perpignan–Figueres High Speed railway and the Portugués Dam in Ponce, Puerto Rico, among others.

1 | Vinci (France)

Vinci

Headquartered in Rueil-Malmaison, France, Vinci enjoyed a steady revenue stream. In both 2015 and 2016, it exceeded $44bn to be Europe’s best. The construction outfit was founded in 1899 under the name Société Générale d’Entreprises S.A. and changed to Vinci in 2000. It enjoys deep roots in Europe and worldwide interests that include airports in Japan, Brazil, Portugal and has won public works projects in the United States. CEO Xavier Huillard oversees an operation of more than 180,000 employees. The company’s notable works include the Gariep Dam, Yamoussoukro Basilica, Pont de Normandie, Stade de France, and the Atlantic Bridge, Panama, which is expected to be completed in 2018.

 

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